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Written by Shalom Suniula    Wednesday, 22 May 2013 22:29    PDF Print Write e-mail
Suniula - The Pressure On in Glasgow - P
RUGBYmag Premier - Premier Content


Shalom Suniula discusses the team's buildup and ultimate success at the Glasgow 7s This column is available for Premier Subscribers.

 
Written by Alex Goff    Tuesday, 21 May 2013 19:29    PDF Print Write e-mail
Test Status or No for USA-Canada Game? - P
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The IRB is looking to change the status of this weekend's USA v. Canada game.

 
Written by Alex Goff    Tuesday, 21 May 2013 19:29    PDF Print Write e-mail
Test Status or No for USA-Canada Game? - P
RUGBYmag Premier - Premier Content


The IRB is looking to change the status of this weekend's USA v. Canada game.

 
Written by Alex Goff    Saturday, 18 May 2013 12:47    PDF Print Write e-mail
A Quick Analysis of the Eagles Women 7s - P
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Fourth place is just fine for the USA women's 7s team as they completed the first-ever IRB Women's World Series Saturday in Amsterdam.

 
Written by Jackie Finlan    Friday, 17 May 2013 15:11    PDF Print Write e-mail
Suggitt, Owsiany Assess Amsterdam 7s '- P
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It’s grueling playing international 7s tournaments in back-to-back weekends, but the quick turnaround does have its benefits. A team can assess their performance and then immediately test those adjustments in another high-level forum. The USA 7s Women have taken advantage of that opportunity at the Amsterdam 7s. After bowing out of the London 7s to Australia (28-7 semifinal loss), the Eagles have rebounded less than a week later, ending day one 3-0 and bagging a redemptive win against Australia (10-5) en route to the #2 seed in the Cup quarterfinals.

A familiar sight: Jill Potter plants an Australian ballcarrier. (Ian Muir photo)

“London was used as a feeling-out for certain positional changes, and we found them to be very promising,” USA 7s Women’s coach Ric Suggitt said. “Do not get me wrong – we certainly wanted to win in London, and we had our chances in the first half against Australia, but we let it slip away on us.”

Among the positional changes is Christy Ringgenberg, who has cycled out of the flyhalf position into the forwards. Kimber Rozier and Sadie Anderson took turns at flyhalf in London, and the former got the start in all three pool play wins today. The most notable change comes in the form of Deven Owsiany, who has moved from hooker to scrumhalf, getting the start over Katie Dowty.

“To be honest I have no idea how me at scrumhalf came about, but it's sweet,” Owsiany said. “I like playing in the middle of the field, and it is definitely a great thing to be able to play multiple positions, scrumhalf being one.”

“For here, in Amsterdam, we settled in on those changes from London, and the players have accepted ownership,” Suggitt said. “All 12 players have an important role to fill, and they have been doing that on and off the field.”

One of the most exciting aspects of the USA’s game, both in London and here in Amsterdam, is the team’s tenacity in the breakdown. The Eagles have had great success disrupting teams trying to get out of their own end, and they’re doing well to create more opportunities for each other.

“We’ve been putting a lot of our focus on defense, finishing our tackles and communicating, or like we say, ‘narrating the game,’” Owsiany said. “I saw a lot of improvement today. People were finishing their tackles and making them count – especially Jillion [Potter], making some huge hits to really set the tempo of the game. We can always rely on her for that.”

In tight, the USA threatens in contact; however, the team still showed some vulnerability as the ball moved away from the breakdown. The true test came against Australia during the final pool play round. The Eagles dug deep, met the Australians in physicality, and opened up space for Vanesha McGee to score two tries in the 10-5 win.

“It’s always a good match to see Australia,” Owsiany said. “I definitely liked seeing them so soon after we came up short in London. Defense was key to that game – really putting Australia under pressure, finishing tackles, communicating and covering each other’s backs. Total team effort today by the girls.”

“There is no secret that after watching the players perform today that they have found the inner strength to step up the physical and mental components of their game,” Suggitt said. “Now we must become consistent; day two is the big day.”

Stay tuned for tomorrow’s Cup quarterfinal against Canada, which finished third in Pool B.

See photos from the USA at the Amsterdam 7s HERE, or check out the players’ stats from today and this season HERE.

 
Written by Alex Goff    Friday, 17 May 2013 12:46    PDF Print Write e-mail
West Point Rugby Facing Discipline - P
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Reliable reports out of West Point indicate that the US Military Academy rugby team is under a disciplinary investigation.

 
Written by Alex Goff    Wednesday, 15 May 2013 13:42    PDF Print Write e-mail
DII Eligibililty Row Comes to End - P
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The St. Louis Bombers have officially been allowed to enter the National DII Club Round of 16 after their appeal of a USA Rugby overturning of a West RFU decision was upheld by a USA Rugby special appellate panel.

 
Written by Alex Goff    Tuesday, 14 May 2013 14:32    PDF Print Write e-mail
Eagle Eye - A Look at the 7s Turnaround - P
RUGBYmag Premier - Premier Content


With the Rugby World Cup 7s six weeks away, we can safely look back at the 2012-2013 Sevens World Series season without feeling like the season isn't really over.

And, really, it's time to write this- and who would have thought that I would be writing what I am about to write?

 
Written by Alex Goff    Friday, 10 May 2013 21:56    PDF Print Write e-mail
Life v NYAC Preview - P
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Life is interfering with the Elite Cup semifinal between NYAC and Life University.

 
Written by Alex Goff    Friday, 10 May 2013 16:18    PDF Print Write e-mail
Niua, USA Look to London - P
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The USA 7s team did what they needed to do in Glasgow and more, and would be excused for relaxing this week and celebrate a return to core status.

 
Written by Jackie Finlan    Friday, 10 May 2013 16:07    PDF Print Write e-mail
Scouting Report: USA Women @ London 7s - P
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The USA Women 7s team is on a two-tournament tour of Europe, competing in this weekend’s London 7s and then the Amsterdam 7s on May 17-18. The latter is a stop on the IRB Women’s Sevens World Series, but interestingly enough, the USA faces a more challenging draw during tomorrow’s invitational.

The USA will miss Lauren Doyle, but Vix Folayan has come on big time in 2013. (Paul Rudman photo)

“We are expecting three very physical games on day one,” USA Women 7s coach Ric Suggitt said. “The players have done an excellent job over the past couple of weeks preparing for this tournament and of course Amsterdam.”

The USA will play teams all along their familiarity spectrum. The Eagles begin with Russia, a team the Americans have played once; followed by Ireland, a newcomer on the IRB circuit; and end day one against their ultimate rival, Canada.

First up, Russia (6:12 a.m. ET), a team that burst onto the scene in Dubai, winning the Plate over Canada. They followed that breakout performance in Houston and launched Baizat Khamidova into stardom. Tall, and almost awkward, Khamidova pulls away in space and led the Houston tournament with nine tries. Teammate Ekaterina Kazakova is tenacious and quick, and also has a penchant for the try zone. Russia is a tough way to open a tournament, especially if the USA starts slowly, which they’ve been wont to do at times.

At 9:14 a.m. (ET), the Eagles face Ireland, which made their IRB series debut in Guangzhou, China. Like Russia, the Irish impressed with a Plate championship, winning a 15-14 rematch over Australia and edging the Netherlands 14-10 en route to the trophy. Alison Miller, Jeannette Feighery and Jenny Murphy stood out during the knockout rounds, and they’ve made the trip to London.

And then comes Canada (12:50 p.m. ET). The North American rivals have only played each other twice this season (excluding representative sides at the Las Vegas Invitational), the first game ending in a 12-12 tie and the follow-up going Canada’s way 17-5 for 3rd in China. Canada is incredibly deep; however, they are missing one of their fastest players, Bianca Farella, and best performers, Ashley Steacy, to injury. Farella might be back in time for Amsterdam; however, Steacy’s broken hand is causing Canada coach John Tait some anxiety as he looks to the world cup.

That said, Canada has brought a slew of heavy-hitters in Mandy Marchak, Jen Kish, Magali Harvey, Kelly Russell, and one of the most exciting players on the circuit, Ghislaine Landry.

The USA has brought a veteran squad as well, as all of the travelers are coming out of the residency program. There are two personnel adjustments of note, however: First, Bui Baravilala is back.

“It's great to have Bui back in the lineup,” USA 7s teammate Deven Owsiany said. “Both on and off the field, she brings great chemistry to this team. She has worked really hard the past few months to get back on the squad, and we are really excited to have her back. She deserves it.”

Baravilala will punch up the lineup but also bring a sense of daring, which is always key to a successful 7s team. But with the youngster’s re-introduction, one mourns the loss of Lauren Doyle, who tore her ACL in China. Doyle had a fantastic Houston 7s performance (remember the South Africa game?!) and was a leading scorer for the Eagles on the wing. She’ll be hard to replace, and missed.

Since there are only eight teams competing at the London 7s, everyone qualifies for day two quarterfinals. What does that mean? Don’t be surprised if a team sacrifices a win in order to tweak a lineup or try alternate combinations.

Stay tuned for match reports and player/coach feedback.


London 7s Schedule (All Time Eastern)

(Pool play through Plate championship held at Twickenham's Cardinal Vaughan pitches)

Round 1

5:28 a.m. England v France

5:50 a.m. Australia v Spain

6:12 a.m. USA v Russia

6:34 a.m. Canada v Ireland

 

Round 2

8:30 a.m. England v Spain

8:52 a.m. Australia v France

9:14 a.m. USA v Ireland

9:36 a.m. Canada v Russia

 

Round 3

11:44 a.m. France v Spain

12:06 p.m. England v Australia

12:28 p.m. Russia v Ireland

12:50 p.m. USA v Canada

 

DAY TWO

Quarterfinals

4 a.m. A#3 v B#2

4:22 a.m. A#2 v B#3

4:44 a.m. A#1 v B#4

5:06 a.m. A#4 v B#1

 

Plate Semifinals: 6:12 a.m. and 6:34 a.m.

Plate Final - 8: 46 a.m.

Final Four inside Twickenham (not streamed)

 
Written by Pat Clifton    Friday, 10 May 2013 11:45    PDF Print Write e-mail
Predicting the May Eagle Squad - P
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The Eagles congregate May 17 in Glendale, Colo. for a camp that will last well over a month. Their first item on the to-do list? Prepare for a non-rankings, non-cap match against Canada May 25 in Edmonton, Alberta.

 
Written by Eamonn Hogan    Friday, 10 May 2013 10:29    PDF Print Write e-mail
Eamonn Hogan: Don't Look Up in Envy - P
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Contributing writer Eamonn Hogan also writes for Rugby Coach Weekly, drawing on his 22 years of coaching experience in England - from the British military to the Leicester Tigers - to his involvement with the USA All American age grade program, where he serves as advisor. Hogan is also a technical advisor to Worksop College Rugby.  


I would love to be a professional rugby coach. I am sure many of you would love to be one of those mythical creatures, too. Getting paid to do what you love isn’t work at all. However, are we all in love with the idea of getting paid for doing something we do for free already?

Professional rugby gets the spotlight, but amateur rugby is where the fun's at.

My brother works in the motor vehicle industry and is as good a mechanic in his spare time as you are likely to meet. He is so good that professional teams in Ireland recruit him as their pit boss, and he spends his weekends stuck under some high performance heap, freezing, covered in mud with the biggest smile on his face. His view on life is if you can get paid for doing something you love, then you’ll never work a day in your life.

Sadly, I am in the Tiger Woods category. He once said that if you do your hobby for a job, then what are you going to do for a hobby? I coach rugby at a private high school and university; I contribute to this esteemed website, writing out my thoughts and opinions on the game; I spend all of my time reading sports management books; and I watch at least 10 hours of rugby per week on television. But I am not a professional rugby coach; if anything, I am a professional rugby voyeur. A professional coach requires much more effort and energy than I currently give, so I am still firmly placed in the amateur rugby family – along with nearly all of you.

Although I would jump at the chance to coach for a living (and have attempted to do so for many years), today, I can express my thoughts in any way I see fit without being accused of walking “the party line”. I don't have to wear the corporate kit or be mindful that the result is all that matters. Player development isn’t someone else’s job, and I can have as many fake girlfriends as I want and Katie Couric couldn't care less.

Don't decry the fact that you cannot devote more time as an amateur coach to the game, because honestly, the young players and fellow coach friends of mine who have gone pro will tell you that although they love being at the top of the tree, it isn’t really that much fun … it’s a job – a superb and exciting one, but not one that could be classed within a donkey’s roar of fun.

Being a professional coach is one of great challenges, huge demands and constant pressure. I loved it when I did it, and as I said, would love to do it again, but amateur coaching is where the fun’s at. I have a thousand stories of things I saw as an amateur coach that I never saw in my years as a paid one.

I once had a player arrested 15 minutes into the second half of a game by armed military police officers.

My team once gave away a try on tour in Spain because they were on all fours bah-ing like sheep because someone used the "special code word’’.

In Germany, I made a player the honorary captain for his final game, and he was so excited that he jumped up on the spot, hit his head on the door frame and was taken to the hospital for six stitches. He played when he came back though. Heroic.

After a match in Cologne, my second row took an instant dislike to a Neo-Nazi who was drinking nearby with his similarly shaved-head friends. He walked over to one of them, handed him some coins and walked back. When I asked what he was doing, he said he gave the guys some coins to phone his friends so he could start a fight with them in the parking lot outside. My second row was a British police officer.

In Scotland, I had a scrumhalf who was nicknamed “Blind Phil” due to his predisposition to pick the ball at the scrum and go down the blind side on his own. Despite months of asking him not to do this, in one game, I finally lost my temper and screamed at him, calling him every unprintable name I could. At halftime, I called him to the side and asked why didn't he pass the ball when it was obvious we had many opportunities out wide. “Eamonn, I will not pass the ball to someone who has less talent than I do.”

My final game of rugby as a player was a 1999 tour match in Florida. After the game, we asked where the showers were, and their captain pointed at the Atlantic Ocean, saying, “It’s 78 degrees, why do you need a shower?" Sadly, one of my players took the man literally and walked naked, with some shower gel, into the water with horrified pensioners and families watching on. Didn't take long for the federales to turn up.

I can assure you, the aforementioned does not happen in professional rugby despite what the players may tell you. Many would LIKE it to be that way, but it really isn’t. Rugby is at its most fun at the amateur level and long may it be so. I spend most of my time coaching amateur players today, and there are many times I am frustrated by the lack of time or commitment they show, but I have to remember that not everyone is a rugby bore like me.

Amateur rugby holds the soul of the game and needs to be cherished and nurtured by new generations of players and coaches. Professional rugby is for a very small percentage of players who with a combination of hard work, genetics and luck seek to make a living from the game. There is no harm in admitting the professional game, having had a little exposure to it in my time at Leicester Tigers, is a wondrous thing to be involved with. It’s challenging, demanding, frustrating and the biggest rush you can get as a rugby coach. It’s rewarding and very enjoyable, but fun it is not.

Professional rugby will come to the USA soon enough. As sevens becomes more popular and with 7s and 15s world cups, Six Nations and Rugby Championship games aired live now, it’s inevitable that some bright spark will invest funds in the game and start a professional league. While it’s fully amateur, enjoy the ride.

In 1974, the British and Irish Lions Invitational side, the same one that is travelling to Australia this summer, went to South Africa and didn't lose a game in three months. The captain of that tour was a Northern Irishman called Willie John McBride, who throughout his life said that his tour wouldn't have been the same without the support and strength of his second row partner, Gordon Brown of Scotland. In 2001, Gordon died from cancer and Willie John was asked to speak at his funeral. He gave a moving speech and finished it with a line by poet W.B. Yeats:

“Think where man's glory most begins and ends, and say my glory was I had such friends.”

Amateur rugby gives you friends who at the end of your time will speak of you like this. If you cherish the game and the people who play it, it will return to you tenfold what you give to it. This is what amateur rugby is really all about and long may it be so.


 
Written by Alex Goff    Thursday, 09 May 2013 19:55    PDF Print Write e-mail
Eagle Eye: Eagles Do What They Need to Do - P
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The USA 7s team did a few things this past weekend that they needed to do.

 
Written by Alex Goff    Thursday, 02 May 2013 16:06    PDF Print Write e-mail
Cal Back in Championship Spotlight - P
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Things seem to be back to normal in Berkeley, Calif.

 
Written by Jackie Finlan    Thursday, 02 May 2013 10:41    PDF Print Write e-mail
College Game to Watch: Quinnipiac vs Winona - P
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In 2012, Rugby Magazine named the Norwich vs. Washington State DII championship semifinal the women’s game of the year. Many regarded that match as the true title bout, and WSU has returned to Palo Alto, Calif., to claim that trophy in 2013. The Cougars are heavily favored to go all the way, but that doesn’t mean the weekend will belong to Washington State.

Quinnipiac, a top-four team after only two years in existence.

The match we’re most excited to watch is Winona State vs. Quinnipiac in the semifinals. Winona have experience on their side, having advanced to last year’s DII final. They’ve continued their dominating ways throughout the 2012-13 season and encountered little resistance in their return trip to Stanford. Quinnipiac lacks that experience; however, they’ve played some more competitive (i.e., closer) matches, and being only two years old, have the element of surprise on their side.

When the Hamden, Conn., team played their first league game in fall 2011, they resembled many college sides: Began with 60 walk-ons, whittled down to 30, and then retained a core group of 12 who were dedicated to the sport. Everyone was a rookie, and that first season ended with a 3-6-1 record, which met the expectations of head coach Becky Carlson and her first-year team.

“During my peer interview at Quinnipiac, many of the other coaches had asked about my plans for the program,” Carlson reflected. “I said that I hoped, within a few seasons, to be among the top five in the nation and vye for a national championship. There weren’t too many of my peers who believed me at the time.”

But the student athletes didn’t want to wait a few seasons. After their first year concluded, the players sat down with coaches and decided they wanted the conference and national titles, now. Pleasantly surprised, the coaches laid out the pathway toward drastic improvement, and also upped the recruitment effort.

An NCAA varsity sport, Quinnipiac has the ability to offer scholarships. The Bobcats acquired one of the more exciting players to grace the pitch this year – Florida’s Natalie Kosko, a former gymnast, who played with the USA 7s Stars & Stripes in Las Vegas last February. Elisa Cuellar (Sebastian River, Fla.) and Shannon Durkin (Bishop O'Dowd, Calif.), both of whom had some rugby experience to their credits, also bolstered the roster.

“We’ve added a mix of talented rugby players and crossover athletes who’ve been recruited,” Carlson said, “but this [team success] has truly been a collective effort. The core of 12 is a testament to them practicing six days a week, weight training, strength and conditioning. They really enjoy playing with each other and want to win.”

The team saw results immediately. The wins started to add up as the Bobcats worked through the inaugural regular season of the new Tri-State Conference. Confidence was buliding, but it wasn’t until their game against Vassar that Quinnipiac really started to believe that something special was coalescing.

Several players were out of position due to injury, and Kosko was playing in her first game since recovering from a foot injury. At one point, Quinnipiac found themselves down three players, defending their own five-meter for what seemed like an eternity.

“There’s not much you can do as a coach at that point; that’s all guts,” Carlson remembered. “Vassar didn’t score. That game lit a fire under them; it was amazing. They just looked at each other and saw their starting lineup right there – and that’s the way it’s been ever since.”

Quinnipiac had developed these t-shirts together that simply read: Believe. Carlson told her squad that if they believed in each other, then anything was possible; and once the team displayed that trust, they’d earn the right to wear those shirts. They donned those “Believe” t-shirts with pride after the Vassar game.

The Bobcats didn’t cruise to the conference title or through national playoffs, not like the way Washington State or Winona have. Albany proved a worthy opponent in the fall, playing Quinnipiac to two tough games during league and for the conference title. In the Round of 16, the Connecticut side took a half to adjust to the tempo of play and intensity at the breakdown against Lee. Battling back from a deficit and weathering the anxiety of a score-trading match, Quinnipiac pulled through with a 25-20 victory.

“We were prepared for this,” Carlson said of Lee and Appalachian State, Quinnipiac’s quarterfinal opponent. “You continue in this tournament and you’re going to see better teams, a higher level of athleticism. I told the players, ‘There’s going to be a time when you get scored on, and you’re standing in the try zone with this unfamiliar feeling. But how you bounce back from that is going to prove what kind of team you are.’”

But the rapid success hasn’t gone to the team’s head. They’ve earned the confidence that results from hard work and shared successes and trials, but they’re also embracing that “good kind of nervous,” according to Carlson, that wards off complacency.

“There’s an incredible amount of humility that comes with it,” Carlson said of the team’s achievements. “Yes, you go out there with a feeling of confidence that you’re going to win, but you still approach every game as a championship game.”

Now, it’s reality. Quinnipiac will play in the program’s highest-stake game tomorrow against Winona, and the winner will very likely see Washington State in the final Saturday.

 
Written by Jackie Finlan    Thursday, 02 May 2013 10:41    PDF Print Write e-mail
College Game to Watch: Quinnipiac vs Winona - P
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In 2012, Rugby Magazine named the Norwich vs. Washington State DII championship semifinal the women’s game of the year. Many regarded that match as the true title bout, and WSU has returned to Palo Alto, Calif., to claim that trophy in 2013. The Cougars are heavily favored to go all the way, but that doesn’t mean the weekend will belong to Washington State.

Quinnipiac, a top-four team after only two years in existence.

The match we’re most excited to watch is Winona State vs. Quinnipiac in the semifinals. Winona have experience on their side, having advanced to last year’s DII final. They’ve continued their dominating ways throughout the 2012-13 season and encountered little resistance in their return trip to Stanford. Quinnipiac lacks that experience; however, they’ve played some more competitive (i.e., closer) matches, and being only two years old, have the element of surprise on their side.

When the Hamden, Conn., team played their first league game in fall 2011, they resembled many college sides: Began with 60 walk-ons, whittled down to 30, and then retained a core group of 12 who were dedicated to the sport. Everyone was a rookie, and that first season ended with a 3-6-1 record, which met the expectations of head coach Becky Carlson and her first-year team.

“During my peer interview at Quinnipiac, many of the other coaches had asked about my plans for the program,” Carlson reflected. “I said that I hoped, within a few seasons, to be among the top five in the nation and vye for a national championship. There weren’t too many of my peers who believed me at the time.”

But the student athletes didn’t want to wait a few seasons. After their first year concluded, the players sat down with coaches and decided they wanted the conference and national titles, now. Pleasantly surprised, the coaches laid out the pathway toward drastic improvement, and also upped the recruitment effort.

An NCAA varsity sport, Quinnipiac has the ability to offer scholarships. The Bobcats acquired one of the more exciting players to grace the pitch this year – Florida’s Natalie Kosko, a former gymnast, who played with the USA 7s Stars & Stripes in Las Vegas last February. Elisa Cuellar (Sebastian River, Fla.) and Shannon Durkin (Bishop O'Dowd, Calif.), both of whom had some rugby experience to their credits, also bolstered the roster.

“We’ve added a mix of talented rugby players and crossover athletes who’ve been recruited,” Carlson said, “but this [team success] has truly been a collective effort. The core of 12 is a testament to them practicing six days a week, weight training, strength and conditioning. They really enjoy playing with each other and want to win.”

The team saw results immediately. The wins started to add up as the Bobcats worked through the inaugural regular season of the new Tri-State Conference. Confidence was buliding, but it wasn’t until their game against Vassar that Quinnipiac really started to believe that something special was coalescing.

Several players were out of position due to injury, and Kosko was playing in her first game since recovering from a foot injury. At one point, Quinnipiac found themselves down three players, defending their own five-meter for what seemed like an eternity.

“There’s not much you can do as a coach at that point; that’s all guts,” Carlson remembered. “Vassar didn’t score. That game lit a fire under them; it was amazing. They just looked at each other and saw their starting lineup right there – and that’s the way it’s been ever since.”

Quinnipiac had developed these t-shirts together that simply read: Believe. Carlson told her squad that if they believed in each other, then anything was possible; and once the team displayed that trust, they’d earn the right to wear those shirts. They donned those “Believe” t-shirts with pride after the Vassar game.

The Bobcats didn’t cruise to the conference title or through national playoffs, not like the way Washington State or Winona have. Albany proved a worthy opponent in the fall, playing Quinnipiac to two tough games during league and for the conference title. In the Round of 16, the Connecticut side took a half to adjust to the tempo of play and intensity at the breakdown against Lee. Battling back from a deficit and weathering the anxiety of a score-trading match, Quinnipiac pulled through with a 25-20 victory.

“We were prepared for this,” Carlson said of Lee and Appalachian State, Quinnipiac’s quarterfinal opponent. “You continue in this tournament and you’re going to see better teams, a higher level of athleticism. I told the players, ‘There’s going to be a time when you get scored on, and you’re standing in the try zone with this unfamiliar feeling. But how you bounce back from that is going to prove what kind of team you are.’”

But the rapid success hasn’t gone to the team’s head. They’ve earned the confidence that results from hard work and shared successes and trials, but they’re also embracing that “good kind of nervous,” according to Carlson, that wards off complacency.

“There’s an incredible amount of humility that comes with it,” Carlson said of the team’s achievements. “Yes, you go out there with a feeling of confidence that you’re going to win, but you still approach every game as a championship game.”

Now, it’s reality. Quinnipiac will play in the program’s highest-stake game tomorrow against Winona, and the winner will very likely see Washington State in the final Saturday.

 
Written by Gavin Hickie    Thursday, 02 May 2013 01:33    PDF Print Write e-mail
Hickie - Educating Your Players on Penalties - P
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RUGBYMag.com Columnist Gavin Hickie discusses why there's some simple advice you can give players about penalties - don't make them!

 
Written by Jackie Finlan    Saturday, 30 March 2013 08:07    PDF Print Write e-mail
Suggitt: No Ifs, Ands or Buts - P
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On the surface, going 2-1 during day one of an international tournament isn't a bad result. But for the USA Women 7s team at the China 7s, those wins weren't the prettiest of performances, and the team's shortcomings were exposed against England.

It was a rainy day for everyone at the China 7s, but Suggitt says that's no excuse for the team's performance.

"The good news is that we advanced to the Cup round," USA Women 7s coach Ric Suggitt said. "We had some first-game jitters against Fiji, but still managed to come away with a victory. Against China, we got caught asleep at the wheel for the first six minutes. A good rebound at that point got us the all-important two victories in pool play."

Those two wins automatically qualified the USA for the Cup round; however, the Eagles had to first take on Houston 7s champion England before calling it a day.

"We had a great kickoff start, and then it all went downhill from there," Suggitt said. "We got outworked and out-muscled at the breakdown. We didn't cover well when the first-up tackles were missed. When the reserves game into the game, I thought they did some good things, but the gap was way too large. We then ended up playing to save face."

"Outworked" and "out-muscled" aren't terms typically associated with the USA women's team, so some big changes need to occur today during the knockouts.

"Going into day two, if plan on moving past the quarters, we will need to tidy up the tackle/ruck area. No ifs, ands or buts about it," Suggitt said. "We have some quality speed, but we failed to utilize it effectively today. We can not complain about the weather."

Tune into tonight via http://wsws.irb.com/ to see whether the USA enacts those changes against Australia, 10:22 p.m. EST.

 
Written by Alex Goff    Tuesday, 19 March 2013 13:46    PDF Print Write e-mail
DIs Thinking Seriously About Fall - P
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DI college teams in the Northeast and possibly the Midwest also are seriously looking at moving to a fall-only schedule.

 
Written by Alex Goff    Monday, 18 March 2013 23:23    PDF Print Write e-mail
Lots to Work on - Magleby - P
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Break a 7s game down and you have a hundred different facets.

 
Written by Alex Goff    Sunday, 17 March 2013 23:26    PDF Print Write e-mail
Magleby: Special Role for Palefau - P
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USA Men's 7s Coach Alex Magleby has a specific plan in mind for Mike Palefau.

 
Written by Alex Goff    Sunday, 17 March 2013 23:09    PDF Print Write e-mail
Audio: Tolkin Talks Eagles - P
RUGBYmag Premier - Premier Content


USA Men's National Team Head Coach speaks with RUGBYMag.com Editor-in-Chief about the USA team in this audio interview exclusive to RUGBYMag.com Premier Subscribers.

 
Written by Alex Goff    Saturday, 16 March 2013 12:54    PDF Print Write e-mail
Petri Out with Thumb Injury - P
RUGBYmag Premier - Premier Content


USA scrumhalf Mike Petri did not play for NYAC Saturday following diagnosis of a thumb injury.

 


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